CASE NASDSE Conference CASE NASDSE Conference

Date: September 25-27, 2016
Location: Milwaukee Hyatt Regency, Milwaukee, WI


Schedule Print Registration Information

This schedule is subject to change. Registrants will receive a conference program at conference check in.

Sunday, September 25, 2016

12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

1. We Know the Terms, But What Does Quality Instruction Look Like in Practice?Regency

Presenters: Colleen Riley (Director of Early Childhood, Special Education, Title Services); Dr. Randy Sprick (Educational Consultant); Randy Sprick (Educational Consultant)

We all know the terms, but what does high quality instruction look like in practice?

Level:

1:30 pm - 2:00 pm

NETWORK TIMERegency

2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

CONCURRENT SESSIONS IN ROOMS LISTED BELOW


2. Embedding Culturally Responsive Practices into Universal SystemExecutive A

Presenters: Andreal Davis (Culturally Responsive Practices Coordinator); Kent Smith (Regional Technical Assistance Coordinator); Milaney Leverson (Regional Technical Assistance Coordinator)

National and state research and data assert that if schools do not attend to culturally responsive practices a system that maintains disproportionate outcomes for culturally diverse students may be created. The session will share resources, explore culturally responsive practices that can be embedded at the universal level of a MLSS, develop the understanding of how culture (practitioners, students and families) can be validated and affirmed while managing the dynamics of difference.

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3. The New Hampshire Story of Transformation: NH UDL Implementation Academy Executive B

Presenters: Ben Crawford (Special Education Teacher); Christine Boston (Director of Pupil Personnel Services); Greg Amend (Co-Lead and ELA Teacher); Kirk Behnke (Senior Director of Professional Learning ); Mary Lane (Bureau of Special Education Consultant )

How do you broaden participation and engagement for all students while providing the specialized supports and services critical for exceptional students? What systems of support and professional development for teachers need to be considered? How will supporting leaders and teachers by building the skills, knowledge and dispositions move districts toward a student-centered, competency-based system?

All of these questions are central to the work of the New Hampshire Department of Education (

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4. Lessons Learned from Building District-Wide MTSS/RTI Executive C

Presenter: John O'Connor (Director of MTSS)

How do you build and foster MTSS/RTI across your school district? In this session, John O'Connor, the Director for MTSS in the Henry County School System, will share the victories, challenges and lessons learned while partnering with schools to provide tiers of interventions across a district with 42.,000 students and 50 schools. John will share how to sell a compelling message to school Principals and provide ongoing support so that changes are seen in adult practices and student performance.

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5. Data Driven Collaboration for Sustaining Change to Improve Student OutcomesExecutive D

Presenters: Anne Louise Thompson (Senior Program Associate); John Provost (Superintendent); Mary Lynn Boscardin (Professor)

The joining of state and local education agencies, universities, and technical assistance centers to help forge strong sustainable partnerships to increase communication and collaboration that is data driven is the topic of this presentation. Tools that increase stakeholder engagement in data driven strategic planning will be explored as an alternative to the use of focus groups that depend on the skill of a facilitator as a way to synthesize diverse opinions. A case study will be presented.

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6. Using MTSS to Promote Comprehensive School Mental and Behavioral Health Milwaukee Room

Presenters: Andria Amador (Director of Behavioral Health Services); Andria Amador (Director of Behavioral Health Services); Melissa Pearrow (Associate Professor of Counseling and School Psychology and Director of the School Psychology Progra); Stacy Skalski (Director of Professional Policy and Practice)

The Boston Public School’s Comprehensive Behavioral Health Model (CBHM) utilizes a multi-tiered system of supports provided collaboratively by school mental health professionals, university students, and urban practitioners from hospitals, community mental health agencies, and law enforcement. This session shares the key successes, learning experiences, and systems challenges encountered while implementing MTSS for student behavior and emotional health and wellness.

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7. Improving Virtual Student Instruction Through Evidence-Based Virtual PD Gilpatrick

Presenters: David Forbush (Project Director); Deanna Taylor (Instructional Coach – Implementation Specialist); John Jeon (Learning Scientist ); Leah Voorhies (Coordinator); Susan Pearl-Weese (Special Education Director)

Delivering effective instruction, resulting in students with disabilities’ learning in virtual settings is challenging. Engaging and sustaining student attention and the motivation necessary for learning is difficult. The Utah Professional Development Network, the Utah State Board of Education – Special Education Section, and a Utah online charter school co-planned PD to strengthen teacher instruction, and student learning, in virtual settings. The challenges, responses, and processes supporting effective instruction in virtual settings will be discussed.

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8. Behavior Support: Real Implementation Must Move Beyond Just TalkLakeshore A/B

Presenter: Dr. Randy Sprick (Educational Consultant)

If behavior support is just posters or matrices on the wall, what is the point? When implemented well, behavior support consists of a continuous improvement cycle in which each year, data shows significant progress on specific objectives from previous years and points to the next priorities for improvement. Each gain should be observable, measurable, and sustainable, even through changes of building- or district-based administrators. Replicable examples of such implementation will be provided.

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9. How Responsive is your Response to Intervention for Students with Dyslexia?Lakeshore C

Presenter: Dr. Martha Burns (Joint Appointment Professor)

Students with developmental dyslexia have differences in the ways they process rapid auditory transitions, as found in speech. Effective remediation can be accomplished by improving rapid auditory processing and oral language skills. Join Dr. Burns to learn about the neurological characteristics of individuals with dyslexia and how the language processes in the brain underlie reading. She also will review how the brain processes the written word and how reading actually changes the brain.

Level:

3:00 pm - 3:15 am

NETWORK TIMERegency

3:15 pm - 4:15 pm

CONCURRENT SESSIONRegency


10. School Mental Health and Trauma-Informed Practices Within An MTSS FrameworkExecutive A

Presenters: Cherie Blanchat (Systems Coordinator); Christina Mann (State Trainer)

Kansas education leaders understand the importance of addressing the needs of the whole child, as evidenced by the Kansas MTSS model which includes behavioral and social components. Learn how Kansas is collaborating with school and community-based professionals, at both state and local levels, to further school mental health and promote trauma-informed practices as part of an effort to promote comprehensive, systemic change. Specific strategies and inherent challenges will be discussed.

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11. ESSA Early Childhood Provisions and their Importance to Special EducationExecutive B

Presenters: Debbie Cate (TA Consultant); Sharon Walsh (TA consultant)

Early childhood research is clear and compelling; high quality preschool can have substantial impacts on children’s early learning. The new Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) has many early childhood provisions which support coordinated high quality preschool. Come join the discussion of the ESSA preschool provisions and why they are important to special education state and local directors.

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12. Behavior Intervention Strategies and Aggression Reduction for Severe SwDExecutive C

Presenter: John Bemis (State Consultant on Emotional Behavioral Disorders)

This session will address the needs of SEA special education leaders answering and attending to issues from the LEAs they serve. Numerous LEAs are strapped with the issue on how to work with students with severe disabilities—most especially students with emotional disabilities struggling with mental health issues. LEAs are looking for answers and/or strategies to provide to their teaching staff. This session will provide SEA directors and consultants an awareness of current issues affecting students with behavioral disabilities who are struggling with mental health and trauma related issues; it will provide the framing of the cascade of events that affect many of our children nationwide—mental health, trauma, and explosive behaviors; and, the session will provide state directors with evidence-based practices and strategies they can share with their LEAs, most especially strategies that involves self-care or vicarious trauma.

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13. Foundations: State and Local Agencies Partnering to Improve Reading & MathExecutive D

Presenters: Doria Sullivan (Regional Planning Consultant for Reading and Math); Julie Bost (Program Specialist for Exceptional Children); Paula Crawford (Section Chief for Program Improvement and Professional Development); William Hussey (North Carolina State Director for Exceptional Children's Services)

Reading and Math Foundations are professional development modules providing teachers with research-based practices in reading and math. It evolved from the North Carolina State Improvement Project in 2000, and has nearly 100 districts implementing state-wide. This leveraging partnership involves collaboration at the state and local levels to support change in district-wide professional development, while improving reading and math instruction for all students, especially those with disabilities.

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14. Check & Connect and Pennsylvania CAPS: Increasing Graduation RatesMilwaukee Room

Presenters: Eileen Klemm (Project Coordinator/National Trainer); Laura Moran (Educational Consultant)

Check & Connect (C&C) is an evidence-based dropout prevention intervention developed in 1990 at the University of Minnesota (UMN). UMN has partnered with Pennsylvania’s Training and Technical Assistance Network (PaTTAN) to build their capacity to provide C&C training to LEAs. Through a train-the-trainer model, PA now has 12 certified C&C trainers to support their SSIP goal to increase graduation rates of students with disabilities. Completion for All Pennsylvania ‘s Students (CAPS).

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15. Forget the Silos! How to Effectively Implement MTSSGilpatrick

Presenters: Jacquelyne Wilson (Interim Superintendent); Randi Kulis (Director of Student Services)

There are many models of MTSS/RTI and which you choose to base your practice on is less important than how it is implemented. This presentation will provide a generic MTSS/RTI model to serve as a template on which to build a clear implementation plan focused on collaboration at all levels of an educational system, and strong, meaningful educational outcomes for all students. The presentation will address both the tangible processes as well as the intangible (belief) barriers that inhibit change.

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16. LInking the Voice of Special Education and Universal Instruction in an MLSSLakeshore A/B

Presenters: Kathy Ryder (Director); Sarah Nelson (Regional Technical Assistance Coordinator)

By reflecting on current literacy practices, schools/districts recognized a need to build strong understanding of effective reading instruction and establish systemic foundational beliefs about what literacy instruction looks like for ALL students. Necessary conversations involving general and special education staff around universal reading instruction, the role of behavior expectations aligned to an instructional framework, and learner variability need to take place.

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17. Use Universal Design for Learning Lesson Plans to Scaffold Co-Teaching Lakeshore C

Presenters: Ellen Cook (Doctoral Candidate); Susan Courey (Associate Professor)

Establishing a co-teaching relationship using UDL lesson plans offers a powerful foundation for collaboration. Teachers efficiently utilize their scarce common planning time and effectively share their expertise to meet students’ individual needs.

Level:

4:15 pm - 5:30 pm

VISIT THE EXHIBITORS / SILENT AUCTION / NETWORK WITH COLLEAGUESRegency

Monday, September 26, 2016

7:30 am - 8:15 am

BREAKFASTRegency

8:15 am - 8:30 am

18. Dr. Tony Evers, Wisconsin State SuperintendentRegency

Presenter: Tony Evers (State Superintendent)

Wisconsin's State Superintendent of Public Instruction welcomes you to Wisconsin and this years CASE NASDSE Conference

Level:

8:30 am - 9:45 am

19. What Should State and LEAs Be Doing About Online Learning w/ SPED students?Regency

Presenters: Daryl Mellard (Project Director); James Basham (Associate Professor); Skip Stahl (Educational Consultant)

"What Should State and Local Education Agencies Be Doing About Online Learning for Students with Disabilities?" James (Jamie) Basham, Ph.D, Darly Mellard, Skip Stahl

Level:

9:45 am - 10:00 am

NETWORKINGRegency

10:00 am - 11:00 am

CONCURRENT SESSIONS IN ROOMS LISTED BELOWRegency


20. Everybody Wins: Technology for Professional Learning and CommunitiesExecutive A

Presenters: Ellen Cook (Doctoral Candidate); Susan Courey (Associate Professor)

This presentation describes the collaboration between a university and school district. The result is an induction program that allows teachers to differentiate their own professional development and “shifts direct instruction outside of the group learning space to the individual learning space” (Hamdan, 2013). Using technology and sharing resources the program provides individualized support and training allowing for differences in school environment, culture, and student learning needs.

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21. Measuring UDL & Accessibility in Online LearningExecutive B

Presenter: Sean Smith (Professor)

The tremendous growth in K-12 online demands an understanding of its availability to struggling students and those with disability. Yes, availability and not simply accessibility. This presentation will feature the introduction of two tools that can be used to determine the alignment of blended and fully online content/curriculum to accessibility guidelines and to the principles, related guidelines and checkpoints affiliated with Universal Design for Learning.

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22. Educational Principles & Practices to Address Online Learning Environments Executive C

Presenters: Jesse Pace (Graduate Research Assistant :The Center on Online Learning and Students with Disabilities); Toni Crouse (GRA); Tracey Hall (Senior Research Scientist/Instructional Designer)

Preparing teachers to meet the needs of all learners in blended and online environments is essential. While online learning holds great promise, there is evidence that outcomes for Students with Disabilities are not so successful. The Center on Online Learning & Students with Disabilities undertook several studies exploring current practices across the country. Presenters will share findings that include specific teaching and assessment strategies for SWD in online and blended learning settings.

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23. Resources for Administrators:Evidence Based Practices to Enhance TransitionExecutive D

Presenters: Kelly Clark (Ph.D Student ); Tosha Owens (Ph.D Student )

The authorization of ESSA includes provisions that require local education agencies to provide evidence based intervention in schools.This session will provide administrators with available tangible resources for personnel involved with the education and services for students with disabilities in middle and high schools. Additionally, instruction on how to navigate the NTACT website, a demonstration of how to use the tools, and guidance on how to apply these to Part B SPP/APR indicators.

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24. Related Services as Teletherapy: Implementation Issues and Future TrendsMilwaukee Room

Presenters: Daryl Mellard (Research Professor/Associate Director); Mary Rice (Researcher); Richard Allen Carter, Jr. (Researcher)

Teletherapies are increasingly used, yet challenging to implement. We present findings from an inquiry into OT, PT, and speech therapies provided online in traditional and virtual schools. Specifically, our findings address the developing provider-student relationships, negotiating with schools for resources and permission for teletherapy, and sharing of technological expertise during therapy. Within this frame, we will highlight current practices and challenges and possible future trends.

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25. State policy and local implementation - online learning and SWDsGilpatrick

Presenters: Dona Meinders (Project Director); Kellie Kim (Senior Researcher)

Findings from IDC’s white paper & interviews of select states revealed that LEAs are responsible for determining LRE and implementation and monitoring of IEPs in online environments.Presentation of findings will be followed by a panel discussion of states and LEAs to discuss key problems of practice and needs for resources that IDC can develop to support greater understanding of implications of online learning for SWDs and its its relationship to high-quality data.

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26. Parent Roles in Online Learning and Students with DisabilitiesLakeshore A/B

Presenters: Bill East (Executive Director, NASDSE); Kelsey Ortiz (Research Assistant)

This session will address the role of parent participation in supporting students in online learning settings, drawing from four COLSD research studies. Presenters will discuss how the rapid growth of online learning in the K-12 educational system challenges previous understandings of how—and to what extent—parents are involved in the education of students with disabilities. Presenters also will offer initial considerations for policy and practice that could provide benefits to educators.

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27. Supporting Students with Disabilities in an Online Educational SettingLakeshore C

Presenters: Nikki Callaghan (District ESE Administrator); Olivia Sinski (Manager of Exceptional Student Education)

Florida Virtual School will provide an overview of the framework of supports that are readily available for all students in their virtual learning environment. Discover how Florida Virtual School ensures the provision and implementation of ESE services, accommodations, related services and other essential supports for students with disabilities (SWD). Discuss your own challenges and share effective practices surrounding reinforcement systems that benefit SWD in an online educational setting.

Level:

11:00 am - 11:30 am

NETWORKINGRegency

11:30 am - 1:30 pm

28. Unpacking the ESSA: Making Implementation Work for Students w/ DisabilitiesRegency

Presenters: Amanda Lowe (Public Policy Analyst); Jacki Ball (Director of Government Affairs); Myrna Mandlawitz (President); Nancy Reder (deputy executive director); Peter Zamora (Director of Federal Relations)

ESSA Panel: Nancy Reder (Moderator), Peter Zamora, Director of Federal Relations, CCSSA, Myrna Mandlawitz, President, MRM Associates, Jackie Ball, Director of Government Affair, National PTA, Amanda Lowe, Public Policy Analyst, National Disability Rights Network

Level:

1:30 pm - 1:45 pm

NETWORKINGRegency

1:45 pm - 2:45 pm

CONCURRENT SESSIONS IN ROOMS LISTED BELOWRegency


29. A New Way to Look at Attendance: Strategies to Address Chronic AbsenceExecutive A

Presenter: Jessica Sprick (Education Consultant)

With the signing of ESSA, chronic absence (students missing 10% or more days for unexcused and excused absence) has become an essential metric for schools to analyze. This session will provide practical strategies to ensure your schools know how to measure chronic absenteeism, and that they are prepared to implement multi-tiered approaches to address concerns. Reduce problems through schoolwide and classroom prevention, then apply function-based approaches to address persistent absence problems.

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30. Building a Sustainable Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports System Executive B

Presenter: Larry Brunson (Executive Director/Founder of BECG and Director, Special Education BSS)

In this session, leaders will get detailed information on how to develop their PBIS system from top to bottom. Strategies will be shared on how to identify areas of focus for the school, how to promote PBIS school and district wide, how to select the stakeholders that will set policy around PBIS and how to measure effectiveness so that it is sustainable over time and as the needs of students change.

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31. ESSA, IDEA, WIOA and Career Development Strategies for YouthExecutive C

Presenter: Jenny Stonemeier (Senior Program Associate)

Recent changes to ESSA & WIOA have elevated the importance of early career development opportunities for youth beyond the typical IDEA transition planning. Research shows that all youth need opportunities to develop skills to manage their own career and postsecondary planning. This session will take participants from research to practice by sharing successful strategies identified by the National Collaborative for Workforce and Disability for Youth.

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32. How to Develop the SPECIAL in Specially Designed InstructionExecutive D

Presenters: Andrea Ogonosky (Licensed Psychologist, Educational Consultant); Cathy Sartain (Educational Consultant)

Participants will be guided through discussions on quality data collection, data analysis, and data-driven decision-making for the purpose of determining areas impacted by the disability, and resulting decisions about the need for SDI. Participants will also be provided information on how to design and incorporate SDI throughout the IEP to address specific needs of the student. Many practical tools and resources will be provided for participants to take back and use in their schools/districts.

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33. Aligning Improvement Strategies, Implementation Science, and Systems ChangeMilwaukee Room

Presenters: Barbara Sims (Co-Director); Courtney Jenkins (Consultant); Julia Hartwig (Assistant Director of Special Education)

This session will outline Wisconsin's RDA improvement strategies, including how the state is leveraging and shifting existing state-wide systems change projects and aligning programming under multiple federal programs to more specifically impact literacy outcomes. Wisconsin's partnership with the SISEP center will be highlighted as a means to ensure strategies are implemented in such a way that will actualize intended results through the use of implementation science.

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34. Kansas MTSS Integrated Framework… the Next GenerationGilpatrick

Presenters: Linda Wilkerson (Coordinator, Kansas MTSS); Todd Wiedemann (Assistant Coordinator, Kansas MTSS)

We will share the Kansas MTSS Integrated Framework, its processes, and how the resulting data can be communicated and used at the district, building, grade, classroom, and individual student level to inform student instruction. We will address reading, math, behavior and social skill domains during this presentation. Our presentation will also provide talking points related to Kansas MTSS being an example of a SEA/LEA project that provides sustainable change to improve student achievement.

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35. Utilizing School Psychologists to Support Trauma Informed School ServicesLakeshore A/B

Presenters: Eric Rossen (Director, Professional Development and Standards); Patrick Bell (School Psychologist); Stacy Overstreet (Department of Psychology Professor and Chair)

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) includes multiple provisions for trauma-informed services in schools, including formula and grant funding for trauma-informed school mental health services and staff development. These provisions, along with recent case law, have the potential to impact referral and service delivery systems nationwide. Learn how a school-community partnership utilizes school mental health professionals to provide trauma-informed services that align with ESSA opportunities.

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36. Using Data to improve teaching, learning and leadershipLakeshore C

Presenters: Peggy Monteith (Director of Special Services); Stephanie Weaver (Education Consultant); Susan Wagner (Education Consultant)

Don't just look at data. Data teams must have a systematic process for examining district, school, and student data. Participants will learn how to use data as a catalyst for guiding important school-wide conversations aimed at fostering collaboration and igniting change to improve student results. This session will provide participants with organized ways to display and analyze data and facilitate data discussions all focused on supporting effective teaching and learning strategies.

Level:

2:45 pm - 3:00 pm

NETWORKINGRegency

3:00 pm - 4:45 pm

37. REMARKS and Q & A ~ With U.S. Secretary John B. King, Jr.Regency

Presenters: Gary Myrah (Executive Director); John Esineberg ( Assistant Superintendent of Special Education and Student Services); John B King, Jr (Secretary)

U.S. Secretary of Education, John B. King, Jr shares insight on education from the national level and participates in a Q & A session with attendees.

Level:

Tuesday, September 27, 2016

7:45 am - 8:30 am

BREAKFASTRegency

8:30 am - 9:45 am

38. Stakeholder Engagement: When Common Sense Turns Strategic!Regency

Presenters: Joanne Cashman (Director); Luann Purcell (Exec Director); Patricia Solomon (.); Stacy Skalski (Director of Professional Policy and Practice)

What is authentic engagement?
Why is it important to seek better and more sustainable outcomes?
How do we maintain stakeholder engagement?

Level:

9:45 am - 10:00 am

NETWORKINGRegency

10:00 am - 11:00 am

CONCURRENT SESSIONS IN ROOMS LISTED BELOWRegency


39. Shifting the Culture; A Story of Collaboration Executive A

Presenters: Debi Kienke (Executive Director of Special Education); Helene Fallon (Project Director); Naomi Brickel (Project Director); Yvette Goorevitch (Director of SPED; New Rochelle School District)

Workshop will identify the key aspects of collaboration and effective communication, focusing on essential elements of team-building while identifying research based strategies and promising practices that have been successful in educational teams working together and greatly improving outcomes for students with disabilities. Examples of how a cutting edge strategy incorporates explicit instruction to support the data that shows the positive impact that effective collaboration has on student performance and outcomes. Participants will explore the framework of Leading by Convening that invites all stakeholders to collaborate effectively and meaningfully.

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40. WI Special Education Mediation System: Grounded in Stakeholder EngagementExecutive B

Presenters: Jan Serak (WI FACETS CEO/Founder); Nissan Bar-Lev (Director of Special EDucation)

A parent and a special education director, who back in 1996 aspired for a non-adversarial system, where parents and schools would be able to work out solutions together, founded the Wisconsin Special Education Mediation System (WSEMS) with the support of a dispute resolution Professor from a local university. This presentation will describe WSEMS’ extensive stakeholders process that defines its day-to-day operation as well as its outreach products that include feedback from parents & educators.

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41. Resuscitate Disengaged Parents Executive C

Presenter: J. Lynn Jones (Senior Educational Consultant)

Why is it such a struggle to engage some parents in their child’s education? It turns out many teachers’ engagement efforts fall flat because their plans focus on just one or two influence strategies. These efforts, while producing modest improvements, are insufficient to create lasting parental involvement. However, educators who understand the science behind the complex model of true influence are significantly more likely to keep parents active in their child’s educational experience.

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42. Get "Better Together" using Authentic Stakeholder EngagementExecutive D

Presenters: Anne Ladd (Family Engagement Specialist); Patti Solomon (C.A.F.E. Facilitator)

Three rural Georgia school districts - where the majority of families live below the federal poverty level - discovered its “better together.”
“Georgia-izing” the IDEA Partnership’s “Leading by Convening” blueprint on building successful stakeholder teams, the GaDOE launched its stakeholder model, Circle of Adults Focusing on Education (C.A.F.E.) The C.A.F.E.s work to both increase graduation rates and to build together academic excitement and innovative practices starting in kindergarten.

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43. Working Together to Transform the Role of the School PsychologistMilwaukee Room

Presenters: Andrea Clyne (School Psychologist and NASP Practice Model Committee Chair); Eric Rossen (Director of Professional Development and Standards); Stacy Skalski (Director of Professional Policy and Practice); Susan Beck (Associate State Director and NASP Practice Model Committee Co-Chair)

The National Association of School Psychologist’s Practice Model articulates an expanded role for school psychologists that better utilizes their knowledge and skills in data- based decision making, problem solving, consultation, prevention, intervention, and mental health. Developing national, state, and local collaborative partnerships are crucial to aligning the role with this national model. Publicly available NASP resources will also be shared.

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44. Working Together: How Three Stakeholder Groups Grew A PartnershipGilpatrick

Presenters: amanda lowe (public policy analyst); Bill Hussey (Director of Exceptional Children Division); Debra Jennings (Director); Nancy Reder (Deputy Executive Director); Vicki Smith (Executive Director)

This session will describe how the National Disability Rights Network joined with NASDSE and the national network of Parent Technical Assistance Centers to showcase how state-level stakeholders are working together to improve systems for students with disabilities. The session focuses on this national-level initiative and features a North Carolina team that will describe its joint work. Building upon the NC example, this interactive session will use Leading by Convening to further the work.

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45. ESSA:Equity in Developing and Implementing Coherent State and Local SystemsLakeshore A/B

Presenters: Debbie Gay (Director of Special Education); Johnny Collett (Director, Special Education Outcomes); Peter Zamora (Director of Federal Relations); Rorie Fitzpatrick (Co-Director); Will Rumbaugh (Director School and District Effectiveness)

The session will highlight the Georgia DOE’s work to elevate equity in its systems of accountability and support and the alignment of its SEA structures to move this work to the local school districts. The session will also highlight technical assistance, support, and resources available from the National Center for Systemic Improvement and the Council of Chief State School Officers, to support states as they implement ESSA and advance college and career ready outcomes for all students.

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46. My Journey to Self-determinationLakeshore C

Presenters: Amanda Randall (State Coordinator ); Annie Downing (Youth Leader); Emily LeSueur (Youth Leader); John McNaught (Co-Director)

A critical marker of success in post-secondary education & beyond is the degree to which individuals with disabilities become a guiding force in their life. Youth of the Virginia Department of Education’s I'm Determined Project will use video and storytelling to present their experiences with self-determination as a critical marker of success.

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11:00 am - 11:30 am

NETWORKINGRegency

11:30 am - 1:15 pm

47. State and Local Directors Panel:Regency

Presenters: Barbara Van Haren (State Director of Special Education); Glenna Gallo (Director of Special Education); Gretchen Cagle (State Director of Special Education); John Peterson (Special Services Director); Kindel Mason (Chair, Professional Development Committee); Wendy Rogers (Educator in Residence)

Barbara Van Haren, Wisconsin State Director of Special Education, John Peterson, Hamilton School District Special Services Supervisor & WCASS President, Gretchen Cagle, Mississippi State Director of Special Education and Wendy Rogers, Mississippi CASE President. Moderated by Glenna Gallo, NASDSE President-Elect and Kindel Mason, CASE Professional Development Chair

Level:

1:15 pm - 1:45 pm

NETWORKINGRegency

1:45 pm - 2:45 pm

CONCURRENT SESSIONS IN ROOMS LISTED BELOWRegency


48. Virginia DOE and Virginia CASE: The Positive Results of PartneringExecutive A

Presenters: Angela Neely (President-Elect VCASE); John Eisenburg (Assistant Superintendent ); Mike Asip (President VCASE); Patricia Hayes (Director); Samantha Hollins (Director); Sheila B Bailey (Executive Director)

VADOE and VCASE share an extensive history of partnering and collaboration that has yielded positive results. Examples of previous and current initiatives include the collection of indicator data, discussions related to seclusion and restraint and plans for the implementation of a state-wide IEP option. VCASE supports VADOE sponsored academies for both new and aspiring special education leaders. VCASE and VDOE support bi-annual professional conferences for Virginia's special education leaders.

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49. Developing collaborative partnerships for inclusive educator preparation Executive B

Presenters: Debbie Gay (Director, CEEDAR Center); Mary Brownell (Director, CEEDAR Center); Susan Zake (Director)

We provide an overview of efforts that Georgia and Ohio are undertaking with the Collaboration For Effective Educator, Development, Accountability and Reform (CEEDAR) Center to facilitate inclusive teacher preparation reform. Representatives from GA and OH will discuss the structures they have instituted to promote collaboration among state agencies, colleges of education, and local school districts in order to support inclusive teacher preparation reform in their respective states.

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50. Facilitating Change and Improving Practices through State-Local PartnershipExecutive C

Presenters: Jolly Piersall (Director); Leah Nellis (Consultant/Associate Professor); Pamela Wright (Director of Special Education); Tad Powless (Director of Special Education); Tish Wagner (School Psychologist Supervisor)

This session will describe services, tools, and supports available through the Indiana Resource Network, funded by the Office of Special Education, Indiana Department of Education. Presenters will represent the state department, statewide resource centers, and a school district that partnered to improve local special education and inclusive practices. Factors and strategies that facilitated the partnership and change initiative will be discussed.

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51. High Quality PD in Practice & Implications for Closing Student Skill GapsExecutive D

Presenters: David Forbush (Project Director); Devin Healey (Specialist); John Jeon (Learning Scientist); Kim Lloyd (Director of Special Education)

The Utah Professional Development Network, in collaboration with the Utah State Board of Education – Special Education Section and Utah LEAs work collaboratively applying a ten step process resulting in professional development designed to close student achievement gaps through enhanced classroom instructional practices. A primary focus of PD is transferring knowledge, skills, and dispositions acquired in the PD setting to class and school settings. Additionally, using an adaptation of Guskey’s PD evaluation system, the effects of PD are evaluated at five levels.

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52. Improving Results: What does it Require of States, Districts, and Schools?Milwaukee Room

Presenters: J. David Sienko (Director - Office of Student, Community and Academic Supports ); Leslie Anderson (Director of Pupil Personnel Services); Louis Danielson (Managing Director); Stephanie Jackson (Managing Director); Teri Marx (Researcher)

To improve outcomes for students with disabilities, the Office of Special Education Programs adopted Results-Driven Accountability (RDA). This session, featuring directors at the Rhode Island Department of Education and a local district, as well as personnel from national technical assistance centers (NCII, NCSI, CEEDAR), will share lessons learned from a unique state-local partnership, including implications for states and districts who are collaborating to improve outcomes under RDA.

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53. Proven Policy and Practice Approaches to Launching Youth Into EmploymentGilpatrick

Presenters: Beth Swedeen (Executive Director); Jennifer Neugart (Outreach Specialist); Karen Flippo (Sr Technical Assistance Specialist); Nancy Molfenter (Transition Consultant)

All states and schools are problem-solving how to comply with the updated Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act (WIOA) and other guidance that promotes grade-level standards based expectations for all students with disabilities, including those with the most significant disabilities.

The Partnerships in Employment (PIE) projects have achieved extraordinary results including building stronger partnerships among state agencies, providing proven strategies to school personnel, a

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54. SEA and LEA Partnering to Improve Behavior and Motivation Through MTSSLakeshore A/B

Presenters: Dr. Randall Sprick (Educational Consultant); Neil Gunthrie (); Randy Sprick (Educational Consultant)

This session will provide an overview of a collaboration between SEA and LEAs to implement and sustain an NREPP-validated and CASE-endorsed approach to behavior support. Consistent messaging from an SEA MTSS Conference, SEA technical support, training for LEA trainers, LEA commitment, and partnering with a validated approach is creating a common language and consistent problem-solving framework that is having a measurable impact at the school level. Learn the components of this collaboration.

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55. Working Together: State and Local Coaches Improve Outcomes for StudentsLakeshore C

Presenters: Julie Fodor (Director, Associate Professor in College of Education, University of Idaho); Kindel Mason (Special Education Director, Jerome School District, Idaho); Renee Miner (Associate Director Special Education Support and Technical Assistance (Idaho SESTA), Boise State Uni)

See how Idaho Professional Development in Autism & Low-incidence Disabilities Supports Project (University of Idaho) collaborated with local district leaders to create teacher-leader coaching to improve outcomes for students with Autism Spectrum Disorder and those with intellectual disabilities in rural schools. One rural school will present real-life experiences developing and delivering targeted on-site professional development and systematic teaming throughout the district to improve outcomes

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2:45 pm - 3:00 pm

NETWORKINGRegency

3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

CONCURRENT SESSIONS IN ROOMS LISTED BELOWRegency


56. Using Secondary Mathematics to Model Effective Instruction: Specially Designed Instruction (SDI) in a Multi-tiered System of Supports (MTSSExecutive A

Presenters: Glenna Gallo (State Director of Special Education); Joleigh Honey (Secondary Mathematics Specialist); Kim Fratto (Special Education Coordinator); Leah Voorhies (Coordinator of Special Education8); Noelle Converse (Special Education Director)

This session will present a matrix for simply and thoroughly understanding the differences between accommodation, differentiation, tiered intervention and specially designed instruction using secondary mathematics. In order for states and locals to implement efficient and effective multi-tiered systems of support, staff need to deeply understand these processes, how they differ and how to implement them appropriately. The 5 Anchors of Differentiation will be applied to all processes.

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57. Supporting and Reporting CEISExecutive B

Presenters: Chris Thacker (TA Specialist); Jana Rosborough (Senior Program Associate); Rachel Zellmer (Special Education Learning Support)

Supporting and Reporting CEIS: Chris Thacker (IDC), Jana Roseborough (NCSI) and Rachel Zellmer (WDPI) - This panel presentation by IDC, NCSI and the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction will discuss CEIS including required and voluntary implementation as well as activities that may be provided using these funds. The session will also review the "Navigating CEIS White Paper and FAQ" documents and discuss data and fiscal requirements for LEAs implementing this program. Additionally, Rachel Zellmer will describe how Wisconsin administers CEIS and works with its LEAs to ensure appropriate services are provided that maximizes impact while addressing, if appropriate, why the LEA was identified.

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58. Charter Schools: Where do they Fit into State Public Education Systems?Executive C

Presenter: Paul ONeill (Senior Fellow)

Autonomous charter schools require states to retrofit policies to accommodate individual schools that have the same responsibility as districts or autonomous public schools within a district. Both arrangements raise questions related to responsibilities associated with educating students with disabilities. This session will explore the legal status of charter and the importance of state and local personnel working together to ensure students with disabilities have equal access to all schools.

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59. The ABCs of Section 504: Accommodations, Beliefs, and ComplianceExecutive D

Presenters: Dan Altschul (Civil Rights Attorney); Gerald Hime (Section 504 Hearing Officer)

This presentation will discuss appropriate and reasonable accommodations that can be provided by school districts and agencies for students with disabilities. Common misconceptions of what the law actually requires as opposed to what frequently is believed will be clarified. The attendees will be provided with actual examples of noncompliance that have resulted in complaints or due process hearing that could have been avoided. The participants will have a clearer understanding of the law.

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60. Building Capacity: A Systemwide Collaboration to Improve Autism ServicesMilwaukee Room

Presenters: Amy Curtiss (ESS Program Specialist/Preschool); Suzanne Perry (Director Early Childhood Special Education)

This session will discuss an ongoing collaboration between the Arizona Department of Education and 40 school districts to increase access to high quality professional development resources. The ADE and school districts made substantial administrative and financial commitments to develop an enhanced network of training sites and coaches supporting the implementation of evidence-based practices for students with autism. Florence Unified School District will present student outcome data.

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61. Developing Parent Partnerships to Improve Student OutcomesGilpatrick

Presenters: Jenell Mroz (Executive Director of Student Services); Kevin Rubenstein (Director of Student Services, Technology, & Assessment)

Developing parent partnerships is one of the underlying principles in the IDEA, but these relationships are not built overnight. Two administrators will discuss the story of how they navigated a tumultuous time in the district. Specific topics covered will include how relationships were developed, the feedback that was sought from parents, the challenges that were faced, and the development of a group of parents who are aimed at improving services for students with disabilities.

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62. Assessing and Teaching the Delinquent, Mentally Ill StudentLakeshore A/B

Presenters: Jan Ostrom (MS, LP, BCBA); William Dikel (M.D.)

This presentation outlines effective interventions for students who have a combination of clinical and behavioral contributors that lead to difficulties in the school environment. The presenters, an applied behavioral analyst and a child psychiatrist, provide practical methods of identifying the nature and relative contributions of clinical versus behavioral aspects, and outline effective assessment and teaching strategies that integrate these behavioral and clinical factors.

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63. Addressing the Challenging Behavior of Students with Mental Health DisorderLakeshore C

Presenters: Kim Warma (Chief Executive Officer); Richard Van Acker (Emeritus professor)

One in five students in our nation's classrooms display a diagnosable mental health disorder. Yet we provide little or no instruction to our teachers related to the identification, needs and effective management of students with mental health disorders. This presentation will explore some of the common mental health disorders of school-age children and youth. More importantly, it will explore effective strategies to address their challenging behavior - including crisis behavior.

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